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Recommended
Diatonic Harmonicas

Hohner 1896/20 Marine Band Harmonica Key of C
Hohner Marine Band
Harmonica;
Keys G-F#

$29.99

Hohner 1896/20 Marine Band Harmonica, Low and High Pitches Key of G High pitch
Hohner 1896/20 Marine Band Harmonica, Low and High Pitches;
Low D-F# & High G

$29.99

Hohner 365 Steve Baker Special Harmonica Key of C
Hohner 365 Steve Baker Special Harmonica; Keys A-C
$54.99 - $59.99

Hohner Blues Harp MS Harmonica Key of C
Hohner 532/20 Blues Harp Harmonica; Keys G-F#
$31.95

Hohner 542/20 Golden Melody Harmonica Pack with Case and Belt
Hohner 542/20 Blues Harp Harmonica Pack
with Case and Belt;
Keys G, A, B, C. D, E, F

$149.99

Hohner 532/20 Blues Harp Harmonica Pack with Case and Belt
Hohner 532/20 Blues Harp Harmonica Pack
with Case and Belt;
Keys G, A, B, C. D, E, F

$149.99

Hohner 54/64 Echo Harmonica
Hohner 54/64 Echo Harmonica; Keys C & G
$74.99


Sonny Boy Williamson II
Aleck Rice Miller
BORN: December 5, 1899, Glendora, MS
Died: May 25, 1965, Helena, AR
Harmonicas Used:  Hohner Marine Band & Blues Harps

    Aleck "Rice" Miller (December 5, 1899 May 25, 1965), a.k.a. Sonny Boy Williamson II, Rice Miller, Willie Williamson, Willie Miller, "Little Boy Blue", "The Goat" and "Footsie," was an American blues harmonica player, singer and songwriter.

History

    Rice Miller was born on the Sara Jones Plantation near Glendora, Mississippi in Tallahatchie County, Mississippi. The date and year of his birth are a matter of some uncertainty. Miller claimed to have been born on December 5, 1899, but one researcher, David Evans, claims to have found census record evidence that he was born around 1912. Miller's gravestone has his birth date as March 11, 1908.

    Miller lived and worked with his sharecropper stepfather, Jim Miller, and mother, Millie Ford, until the early 1930s. Beginning in the 1930s, he traveled around Mississippi and Arkansas and encountered Blind Lemon Jefferson, Big Joe Williams, Elmore James and Robert Lockwood Jr., also known as Robert Junior Lockwood, who would play guitar on his later Checker Records sides. He was also associated with Robert Johnson during this period.

    Williamson developed his style and raffish stage persona during these years. Willie Dixon recalled seeing Lockwood and Sonny Boy, with an amplified harmonica, in Greenville, Mississippi in the 1930s. He captivated audiences with tricks such as holding his harmonica between his top lip and nose and playing with no hands.

    Williamson lived in Twist, Arkansas for a time with Howlin' Wolf's sister Mary Burnett and taught Wolf to play harmonica. (Later, for Chess, Williamson did a parody of Howlin' Wolf entitled "Like Wolf.") In 1941 Miller was hired to play the King Biscuit Time show on radio station KFFA in Helena, Arkansas with Lockwood.

    It was at this point that the radio program's sponsor, Max Moore, began billing Miller as Sonny Boy Williamson, apparently in an attempt to capitalize on the fame of the well known Chicago-based harmonica player and singer John Lee Williamson (see Sonny Boy Williamson I). Although John Lee Williamson was a major blues star who had already released dozens of successful and widely influential records under the name "Sonny Boy Williamson" from 1937 onward, Aleck Miller would later claim to have been the first to use the name, and some blues scholars believe that Miller's assertion he was born in 1899 was a ruse to convince audiences he was old enough to have used the name before John Lee Williamson, who was born in 1914. Whatever the methodology, Miller became "Sonny Boy Williamson," (universally distinguished by blues fans and musicians as "Sonny Boy Williamson number two" or "Sonny Boy Williamson the second") and Lockwood and the rest of his band were the King Biscuit Boys. His growing renown in the mid-south took him places such as West Memphis, Arkansas, where he performed on a KWEM radio show selling the elixir Hadacol.

    Williamson's first recording session took place in 1951 for Lillian McMurray of Jackson, Mississippi's Trumpet Records (three years after the death of John Lee Williamson, which for the first time allowed some legitimacy to Miller's claim to being "the one and only Sonny Boy Williamson".) McMurray later erected Williamson's headstone, near Tutwiler, Mississippi, in 1977.

    When Trumpet went bankrupt in 1955, Sonny Boy's recording contract was yielded to its creditors, who sold it to Chess Records in Chicago, Illinois. Williamson had begun developing a following in Chicago beginning in 1953, when he appeared there as a member of Elmore James's band, and he recorded about 70 songs for Chess subsidiary Checker Records from 1955 to 1964. In the 1960s he toured Europe during the height of the British blues craze, recording with The Yardbirds and The Animals. It was during Williamson's tour of the UK in the '60s that he adopted the bowler hat and carried his harmonicas on stage in a briefcase, which became his trade mark in the last year of his life. During this tour he allegedly stabbed a man during a street fight and left the country abruptly.  (Robert Palmer's Deep Blues)

    In the 1940s Williamson married Mattie Gordon, who remained his wife until his death on May 25, 1965 (or June 23, 1965, according to the headstone) in Helena, Arkansas. Williamson was characterized by a hip-flask of whiskey, a pistol, a knife, a foul mouth, and a short temper. He had always worn fancier suits than he could afford, and his tour of Europe allowed him further embellishment, adding a finely tailored two-tone suit and a bowler hat to his unique, grey-goateed image.

    Rice Miller was, however, notable as a highly original blues songwriter, and his laconic harmonica style and sly vocals mark him as a true artist. His use of space, his timing, and his tone place him among the greatest blues-harp players.

    Some of his hits include "Fattenin' Frogs for Snakes", "Don't Start Me To Talkin'", "Keep It To Yourself", "Your Funeral and My Trial", "Bye Bye Bird", "Nine Below Zero", "Help Me", and the infamous "Little Village", with its R-rated dialogue with Leonard Chess. His song "Eyesight to the Blind" was performed by The Who as a key song in their rock opera Tommy (the only song in that opus not written by a band member) and it was later covered on the Aerosmith album Honkin' on Bobo.

    In interviews in The Last Waltz, roots-rockers The Band recount jamming with Miller prior to their initial fame as Bob Dylan's electric backing band. Had he not died shortly after they would have become his backing band


Recommended
Chromatic Harmonicas and Gear

Hohner 980/40 Koch Chromatic Harmonica Key of C
Hohner 980/40 Koch Chromatic Harmonica;
Keys C & G

$79.99

Hohner 260/40 Chromonica Key of C
Hohner 260/40 Chromonica;
Key C

$109.98

Hohner 268/78 Double Bass-Extended Harmonica
Hohner 268/78 Double Bass-Extended Harmonica
$849.99

Shure SM58 Mic
Shure SM58 Mic
$99.99

Shure SM57 and SM58 Microphone Package
Shure SM57 and SM58 Microphone Package
$669.99

Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue 40W 1x12
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue 40W 1x12" Combo Amp
$699.99

Boss GT-8 Guitar Multi Effects Processor
Boss GT-8 Guitar Multi Effects Processor
$445.00

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